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I started with an Atari 2600 game cartridge. They’re all similar but are slightly different in regards to shape and form.

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This game had one screw to remove under the title graphic.

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I used some flush cutters and a knife to remove all of the internal plastic pieces.  These come out pretty easily.

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I removed most of the top panel (spring loaded sliding piece) leaving just enough to cover the top opening of the game.

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I started this with a knife but a Dremel with a cut off wheel went much quicker.

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I used to super glue to permanently attach it inside the front piece of the game cartridge (the piece with the art work).

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On the back panel, I drilled several small holes into the back face, on both sides.

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I fed through some 1/32″ elastic cord and tied a knot at one end (on the inside). From the knot, I tightened the cord (not stretched tight, just not loose) and tied a knot at the opposite end, again on the inside.

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This left a series of crossing straps to hold cards. As long as these aren’t too tight initially, you can add quite a few cards.

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Near to the top of the front panel, I  drilled a larger hole on each side.

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I found that about 1/2″ down from the top was a good spot for these.

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I fed through a 3/8″ elastic strap, knotting it on the inside of each hole.

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This stretches enough to lift over and hold the two pieces of the cartridge together.

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With the two panels held together by the elastic, I added a piece of Gorilla tape across the bottom face. I used a straight edge to push the tape down into the recessed area.  I used Gorilla tape because it seems to last WAY longer than regular duct tape.

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I used a sharp knife to trim away the excess tape, leaving tape in the recessed area only.

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Opening up the cartridge, I wiped some rubbing alcohol to on the exposed adhesive to dampen it a bit.

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I cut another panel of tape, then a thin strip.  I added the strip to the sticky side of the panel to create a non-sticky area.

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I folded the panel over the joint to create a hinge on the inside of the cartridge.

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In 123d Design, I modeled a simple money clip then 3d printed it.  If you don’t have a 3d printer, you could easily purchase a money clip here.
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It took a few iterations to make a design that worked well. I had to make it have enough tension to hold the bills, but also be thick enough to hold more than one or two dollars.

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I used super glue to attach the clip to the front panel.

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That’s it! Obviously it might not be comfortable if you carry your wallet in your back pocket, but it works great for a front pocket.

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