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I wanted a way to display my helmets in a sleek and minimal way so I made some floating helmet display mounts. This took a lot of problem solving and a few prototypes, but I’m happy with the design! Come check out this build process!

  1. Make a Prototype
  2. Weld Version 2
  3. Add Spring Tension

1. Make a Prototype

The concept behind this helmet display mount is to make an easy way to hang the helmets I’ve made on the wall. There are a lot of hangers, mounts, and arms available to do this, but I had some other criteria that I’d like to address. First, I want to be able to remove the helmets quickly and easily. Second, I don’t want to see any part of the mount when looking at the helmet. Lastly, I didn’t want to damage the helmet at all.

I had a rough idea on how to do this with an L-shaped bracket that would mount to the wall and a spring loaded brace that will clamp the helmet in place. Aluminum stock can easily be cut on most woodworking tools, so I decided to make a prototype. I found some big compression springs and some plywood scraps and cut them into the rough clamp shape. The problem I found with this piston design is that the spring isn’t centered in the mechanism and the brackets don’t pinch as expected. I’m really happy that I started with a rough mockup because I can see a better design more clearly now.

2. Weld Version 2

Armed with a more clear vision of the helmet display mount, I decided to make a triangular shape with a hinged side. This new version would be made from scrap steel, one side mounted to the wall with some protective foam. The pivoting mechanism is made from some large hinges, bent into a curved shape. Together the two pieces of metal form a hinged triangle with a metal slot against the bottom edge. This slot will hold the tension bands later on. To actuate the clamping arm, I made a simple steel ring from some round stock and welded it to the outside of the hinge. This way, you can reach under the helmet, pull the hinge outward against the tension and easily remove the helmet.

3. Add Spring Tension

To add the spring tension to the hinged side, I decided to use rubber bands…well actually a lot of rubber bands. This way, the tension can easily be adjusted to fit each helmet without damaging the walls. After a coat of black, discrete paint, I can screw the mount to the wall. The foam padding on the wall surface and the hinged pinch point protects the helmet from scratches while the spring loaded latch provides the right amount of clamping pressure.

Problem Solving with Prototypes!

I am really happy that I was able to make this floating helmet display mount. This design, while not perfect, does check all of my criteria boxes. Making the prototype allowed me to chase an idea and determine its strengths and weaknesses. I don’t normally make iterations of an idea in a single project video, but I thought it was necessary for you to see that vetting and iterating a concept can help you get to the best version of it.