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If you’ve been keeping up with my projects for a while, you’ve probably heard me talk about my kids (that’s because they’re awesome). Well, three of them are boys, and the youngest has recently graduated to joining his older two brothers in the “boys room”. Not only is the room getting tighter, the closet is getting borderline unusable due to the addition of clothes and extra mess on the floor.

This past week as we were getting ready to head back to school, I decided it was time to update the closet to make it more organized.

This is a very simple project, but made a HUGE difference in the way our boys can access their stuff, and will hopefully set up a system to help them know where things go and keep the room in a tidier state (wishful thinking? maybe…)

Here’s what you’ll need:

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Material Cost:

  • $112 for the wood, sockets, rods..
  • $47 in cloth bins for the cubbies

Here’s where we started, a typical single rod closet.

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I removed the shelf to reuse it.

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Using a pry bar, I removed the ledger that the shelf and rod were sitting on. I patched the holes with some spackling.

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I first cut the shelving top, since it was the widest piece. The entire unit was made from pine 1″x12″.

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Then I setup a stop block, clamped to my table to cut the shelves all the same width.

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This stop block is well behind the blade, to prevent pinching.

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I cut all five shelves to length.

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I countersunk three holes in each end of the top piece.

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I spread glue on the opposite side of the holes I’d added.

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I set the top in place up against the side panels.

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I used a corner clamp to hold the pieces at a 90° angle.

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I screwed the top to the side panels.

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I did the same for the other side.

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I cut two pieces of scrap to the same size, to act as shelf spacers.

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I slid these pieces up against the underside of the top panel.

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Then I slid the next shelf up against the bottom of the spacers.

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This shelf was predrilled (with countersink) and screwed in on both sides.

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I followed the same pattern for the rest of the shelves.

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I avoided glue initially so that the pieces wouldn’t slide around, but once the sides were completely on, I backed out all of the screws.

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Then I added glue to the end of each shelf.

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I screwed them all back together. The pre-existing holes helped line the boards up correctly.

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I measured the area under the bottom shelf and cut a piece to fit that space.

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I used some brads to hold it in place.

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All of the screw holes were filled with wood putty and sanded smooth.

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The whole unit was sanded and painted white.

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I found the center of the closet and set the shelf in place.

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Then I marked where the shelves hit the base board.

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Using a cheap multitool, I cut along the line to separate the trim.

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I pried away the trim pieces and patched the holes with spackle.

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I cut four pieces of 1″x4″ pine to match the depth of the closet.

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I painted the top, bottom and one side of them white. (The other side doesn’t need paint).

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I found a stud, then countersunk two holes in each board.

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I screwed in the top hole, and used it as a pivot point to level the board.

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Then I secured it with the second screw.

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I added a screw to each end, driving them into the corner studs.

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I followed the same method for the other three pieces.

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I set my old top shelf in place.

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I screwed it to the top of the new shelving unit.

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I measured out from the wall and screwed in a pole socket.

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Then I matched this location on the opposite side, and added the other socket. I did the same for the other three poles.

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Using a cut off wheel on my grinder, I cut standard closet rods down to four sections of the correct length.

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These pieces dropped right into the sockets.

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Finally, I cut two more pieces of pine to fit the gap on each side of the shelving unit.

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They were painted white, set in place and leveled.

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From the inside of the shelving unit, I drilled and screwed into the end of the shelves.

Screen-Shot-2015-08-17-at-9.43.35-AMHere it is, all filled out and organized..  had to take a photo while it lasted!
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