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I’ve played disc golf for a while now. Since moving to Kentucky, I haven’t had time to go play much. I wanted to make a practice disc golf basket for our yard so I can teach my kids how to play too.

  1. Cut the Center Post
  2. Bend the Legs
  3. Weld the Baskets
  4. Attach the Chains
  5. Add the Net

1. Cut the Center Post

I researched the dimensions for a disc golf basket from official sources, so I based the height of the center post off that information. After a trip to Lowe’s to get some raw steel rod , flat stock, and fencing material, I began to cut the necessary pieces. The center post was a standard steel upright for a chainlink fence. Using the metal-cutting bandsaw, I easily cut it to length.

2. Bend the Legs

To make the legs, I decided to use 3/4″ EMT conduit bent into 90 degree angles. To bend the pipe, I used a manual conduit bender and pressed the pipe into shape. I bent 4 pieces of the conduit which fit snuggly in the bottom of the center post. These pieces weren’t welded in place because their ability to freely rotate could come in handy when placing the basket outside on uneven ground.

3. Weld the Baskets

The disc golf goal is made up of two baskets attached to the center post. The two baskets will have the same, 1″ steel flat bar band welded to some bent 1/4″ steel rod. The rods are bent into an “S” shape and turned on their sides. I used a manual ring roller to add a curvature to the flat steel. The rods were bent by heating certain areas of the rod with a MapPro torch and bending the soft, heated metal. One leg of the “S” will be welded to the halo ring and the other will be bound to the center post with large hose clamps.

4. Attach the Chains

I drilled several holes in the upper basket and attached chains using snap links. These chains will stop the discs when they hit the goal and drop them into the lower basket. I purchased a few packages of chain in 10-foot sections from Lowe’s and cut them using an angle grinder. You could use a hacksaw or a Dremel tool to do the same thing. The loose ends of the chains were gathered up and bond to the center post using a 5″ hose clamp. The goal was looking like the real thing, all it needed was a way to stop the disc from falling onto the ground.

5. Add the Net

Because I didn’t weld a full cage on the lower basket, we needed a way to keep the discs from falling on the ground once it was stopped by the chains. Many welded pieces of the steel rod  could have formed a metal grate, but I had a small cargo net that would do the same thing. I placed the center post through the center of the cargo net and draped the net into the lower basket. Josh and I cut the excess net and used zip ties to hold it in place.

It Works Better Than I Thought It Would!

I know I say that a lot, but as you may know, I start with the end product in mind and figure it all out as I go. I thought that the disc golf basket would be top-heavy and easy to tip over, but it was surprisingly sturdy. We pulled it out into the yard and had a great time throwing the discs around. Not once did it wobble or show any signs that it wouldn’t last s long time.

I’m really happy that I have yet another fun game in my backyard. It seems like I am starting to have my own private amusement park out back, and my kids are really happy about the fun attractions too!

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